Monoprint

    I’ve been in the college printmaking workshop this week. I finally got round to making some artwork after a long time of writing and reading and worrying. I remembered that making artwork is extremely important to my research. Not knowing what methodology I am using or philosophical principles I mediate is perhaps, a … More Monoprint

Ambiguity

In her essay The Ethics of Ambiguity Simone de Beauvoir proposes that we deconstruct accepted ‘universal’ ways of seeing the world – the individual ‘I’ gazing at the ‘other’ – in favour of a multi-view of interchangeable possibilities, none of which are fixed. “Instead of defining a single centre of a unified world, we could imagine other … More Ambiguity

See?

Iconology A week or so ago I visited Camera Obscura (well worth a visit!) with the second year illustration students and Astrid Jaekel, illustrator and tutor at Edinburgh College of Art.  Investigating all of the optical illusions and disorientating mirror and light displays got me thinking about the nature of seeing. I have recently been … More See?

The Object Stares Back

In The Object Stares Back, the author James Elkins discusses the nature of human perception and how it is not as objective as the beholder would believe. An individual sees what the brain thinks they need to see and to some extent, we are insensible to the selectivity of our vision. In an example of our unwittingly partial view of the world, Elkins reminisces about attracting … More The Object Stares Back

Tchotchkes

My approach to data-collection for illustration practice is to be open to the visual environment through observational sketching, photography and in my habit of collecting ‘tchotchkes’ (from yiddish: trinkets/useless objects). Illustrators seek to visually interpret phenomena in new ways, collecting ephemera and being open to the visual. This compilation of both conscious and unconsciously made influences … More Tchotchkes